No Evil Project - Show that anyone can do good, no matter who they are.

Youngest Child Stereotypes Redefined

Displaying 1 - 10 of 36

Bridgett

Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
I've always loved animals. I've had many strange pets from baby robins to a baby crow. This summer I saw a turtle that had been hit by a car on the side of the highway and saved it. I tended to its wounds, fed it, and then let it go back in the river it was from. My outlook is no matter what creature it is, they all deserve compassion and love.
Why are you participating?: 

I've been judged, I've judged, and I've realized its better to just keep an open mind.

Hayley

Holden, MA
United States
Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
I participate in TOPSoccer which is a nonprofit organization that teaches kids to play soccer that have mental, physical, or emotional disabilities.
Why are you participating?: 

I am participating to help bring awareness to how labels affect people.

Laura

Millbury, MA
United States
Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
The house where I grew up is on the route of the Boston Marathon, just about at the 10-mile mark, and every Patriot's Day, we'd have a big party. That was My Day: I made it my mission to get as many of those runners to laugh or smile (or even just perk up a little) as I could. I would stand out there for hours cheering them on, just to show them we were behind them and try to give them a little boost to keep on going toward the finish line.
Why are you participating?: 

Because we're all so much more than the labels that others put on us (and we put on ourselves)!

Alexandria

Framingham, MA
United States
Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
When I was in the hospital, I met a little girl with ALL and kind of in a bad mental state about being sick. Every day we hung out and every day I talked to her to make her smile. To help her be positive and get better
Why are you participating?: 

Because if everyone just showed the next person a littler more respect and showed a little bit more love, maybe there'd be a little more peace in the world.

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