No Evil Project - Show that anyone can do good, no matter who they are.

Queer Stereotypes Redefined

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Becka

Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
I have shared my sobriety,my home, my art and my voice (my passion) with addicts, and the LBGTQQ community creating safe places for folks to land, create, find and discover who they are.
Why are you participating?: 

this is an inspiring project to help dismantle peoples beliefs, expectations, fears, assumptions, about who they believe someone is, who we ourselves believe we are, what we all share, and how truly amazing, beautiful, different, and multidimensional we all are...and what we are all capable of (

Kristina

Oxford, MA
United States
Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
I volunteer with LGBTQ youth at Safe Homes in Worcester. I love being an example to the kids that growing up doesn't have to mean conforming. I'm not sure that it qualifies as a good deed though. I think they have done more to help me than I have to help them. They remind me why I'm an activist and why the LGBTQ community needs people like myself.
Why are you participating?: 

I truly believe that stereotypes are a detriment to our society. I am judged every singly day of my life and I know that most of those judgements are wrong.

Mackenzi

Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
I listen to others and try to help them through problems. I adopt abandoned cats. Most importantly, whenever I pass people on the street I smile at them or offer another kind gesture, because you never know if they're having a rotten day.
Why are you participating?: 

In the midst of all the bad in the world, goodness still exists. This project is a perfect way to prove that.

Jasmeen

Worcester, MA
United States
Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
Every year I volunteer at The Walk for the Homeless. Rain or shine, I am there. Directing walkers, posting signs or helping pass out food. We raised thousands of dollars a year for the cause.
Why are you participating?: 

I have always liked to help the less fortunate, it feels really good to be part of something that makes a difference in someone's life.

Lou

Wendell, MA
United States
Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
I am an eco-artist, and advocate for decreased plastic usage through my work.
Why are you participating?: 

People are so limited by the labels other put on them. Most labels aren't truly accurate.
I suppose that I am doing this project to say, yes, I am that label. Here's the truth about it and here's why it's actually a compliment.

Allison

Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
Hmm, my good deed. I guess I try to do small 'good deeds' all the time. I feel that the little things always count. Something as small as holding a door for someone or smiling at them can make their day. One time when I hadn't thought much of it I was at Walmart in a small town in Vermont and there was a person behind me who only had one of those Campbell handshake soups and a drink and I let them go ahead of me. Little did I know they were late for class less than a block a way and they were quite appreciative. She and I had a small conversation and I really liked her earrings, she ended up telling me that she made them and was unsure of them. She then gave them to me as a thank you even though I told her she didn't need to. As for my labels of choice I feel that those are reasons people may talk about me. I currently work for a non-profit organization where I am able to use all of these labels in my work. I am a peer support worker/peer outreach counselor. Unlike the traditional counselor I have been trained on how to use my personal experiences whether they be positive or negative to help someone through the paths they are currently in to make powerful and positive choice instead of negative ones. One is able to really say "I get it," as they have literally gone through it. I have been able to start a belly dancing group and work with an LGBTQQAS youth group ages 14-23 and help them be proud and confident of who they are and what they can achieve. One quote I love to sum things up, and to get away from labels that society may put on you comes from the movie 28 Days: "Never be somebody's slogan because YOU ARE poetry."
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