Rock Climber Stereotypes Redefined | No Evil Project
No Evil Project - Show that anyone can do good, no matter who they are.

Rock Climber Stereotypes Redefined

Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Malcom

Worcester, MA
United States
Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
I do my best to be out and proud and try my best to be hyper-aware of my actions and how they affect the people around me. Before transitioning I identified as a queer female and was quite invisible in society. I had to raise my voice to be heard and I had to fight to make sure that my accomplishments were not overlooked by my male counterparts. Now I identify as a white male and society sees me that way. Now I am seen, I am heard. But I remember how it felt to be invisible and remind myself everyday of the women and minorities who are still invisible in this white-male dominated world. They should be seen/heard too. I ask myself how can I help them be heard? How can I be sure that I am not dominating the space? The answer is to listen. To pause when I hear a voice that is trying to be heard, to hold space so that person can speak. Sometimes it can be difficult to shut my mouth, but it is important that I do because my core value is to treat others in the way that I want to be treated.
Why are you participating?: 

I participate because this project is a great concept and has the potential to spread good messages to people. I like to participate every year because I'm constantly evolving/changing and want to reflect that.

Alani

Salem, MA
United States
Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
I ran for a presidential election for the Camp Fire After School Program at my elementary school and won. As the president of the program, I assisted Camp Fire staff with organizing fun activities and games for the other children in the program. My mom and I provided toys and weekly snacks to all students free of charge and I also worked closely with the vice president.
Why are you participating?: 

I wanted to participate with my mom.

Kellee

Baltimore, MD
United States
Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
After the earthquake in Haiti, my friends and I put on a concert to raise funds to send to Doctors Without Borders and The Red Cross. We gave free merchandise to those who supported these efforts. Although I only had $50 in my bank account to last me for 2 weeks, I happily sent all of the money we raised from our show to the two organizations we had chosen so they could help with relief efforts.
Why are you participating?: 

I'm tired of people making erroneous assumptions about others based on stereotypes.

Malcom

Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
I work at an adventure/zip-line park. Over the course of the season I interact with thousands of people, from a variety of different races / cultures / countries / religions / ages / genders / sexual orientations. At the park I have the opportunity to treat everyone equally and with respect, as well as create a safe space for the variety of people have fun with their friends and families. It isn't groundbreaking good deed work or anything, but it is a gratifying feeling to know that you helped create a positive experience for people.
Why are you participating?: 

It is fun!

Sarah

Worcester, MA
United States
Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
I always carry protein bars to hand out to anyone in need. Last week, I gave one to a homeless man who yelled to his friend across the street and tossed him half the bar. Made me smile :)
Why are you participating?: 

The best way to decrease intolerance is to educate and create awareness. I think this is a great cause, and an excellent way to help people see beyond one's immediate appearance.

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