No Evil Project - Show that anyone can do good, no matter who they are.

Queer Stereotypes Redefined

Displaying 1 - 10 of 29

Mel

Worcester, MA
United States
Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
I like to compliment strangers on something that stands out to me about their individual presentation (article of clothing, hairstyle, makeup) for the soul purpose of making them feel good about themselves.
Why are you participating?: 

I am participating because I think it is important to spread the word of the good.

Deborah

Worcester, MA
United States
Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
Worked four years to bring GLBT awareness and training to the staff of my local community health center.
Why are you participating?: 

Bring awareness to a wider community that no one, including those of us who live with disabilities, should be judged or limited by other people's assumptions or prejudices.

Erin

Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
I help my summer campers develop confidence in their abilities and teach them that they can do amazing things no matter how the world sees them.
Why are you participating?: 

I am participating because it's important to recognize just how complex people are and that we cannot be defined or judged by a few words or our appearance.

Ricardo

Boston, MA
United States
Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
Creating a pride club at my school has helped offer not only a space for support, but for conversations about the importance of self-exploration and understanding.
Why are you participating?: 

Because visibility is key.

Ali

Sturbridge, MA
United States
Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
I stood outside of grocery stores asking people to support LGBT rights for nine months. I launched the "Reject Stereotypes, Accept People" Campaign at a conservative business university. I always compliment people on their style.
Why are you participating?: 

Because after I dyed my hair purple and got tattoos, people started rolling their eyes every time I spoke. Because I grew up not knowing girls could be gay. Because LGBT youth are 4 times more likely to contemplate suicide or self-harm.

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