Empath Stereotypes Redefined | No Evil Project
No Evil Project - Show that people aren't defined by their labels.

Empath Stereotypes Redefined

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Julia

Lancaster, MA
United States
Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
I spend my time helping others who are newly diagnosed with chronic illness navigate their new world of doctors, disability, and isolation. I do everything possible to support those who are dangerously depressed, and I work to break down prejudice toward disability and invisible illness.
Why are you participating?: 

I am constantly struggling with the issues listed above myself. I would like people to know that those of us who can't work still do good things - and we would KILL to be able to work.

Sandy

Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
I volunteered as a hotline counselor at the Worcester Suicide Prevention Center.
Why are you participating?: 

Great cause that is important (breaking stereotypes!) and happy to support creative thought leaders and activist artists!

Natalie

Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
I volunteered at my local farmer's market providing art making activities to children.
Why are you participating?: 

I am an art therapist who works with adults who were abused and neglected as children trauma has affected my life and has impacted being in relationships throughout my life and I love being able to help others heal through art and the connections I build with them in counseling.

Lauren

Millis, MA
United States
Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
Each day, I do my best to use perspective in any situation I'm in. The world would be more peaceful if we realized we are all the same but living it up differently.

Susan

Tell Us Your Good Deed: 
Spent my life fighting for economic justice. But one of my favorite deeds was winning a court battle for a woman in Tennessee to change the last name of her triplets to hers from the name of the father. The father wouldn't pay child support but would pay for a lawyer to fight the name change! And the mother worked three jobs to support her kids.
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